Why Do We Need The Commonwealth Environmental Pledge?

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The health of our economy, our residents, and our environment are inextricably linked. Those who take the Commonwealth Environmental Pledge know that clean air, pure water, and great public open spaces make Massachusetts stronger. By investing in and protecting these critical assets, we improve the quality of life for us all.

Our economy and quality of life depend on our leadership on climate change. We have 1,500 miles of coastline, 10,000 miles of rivers, nearly 7 million people, and a stunning array of species and habitats. We all will suffer without proactive, ambitious policies that accelerate the transition to a low carbon energy system and build resilience.

Environmental leaders know that our state has everything it needs to lead. Our Commonwealth has the financial, intellectual and natural capital to design and implement innovative solutions. Furthermore, we can export these ideas, products and services to catalyze progress in other states and nations. Already, we have over 100,000 clean energy jobs -- and counting. This number will grow as we invest in new offshore wind, solar energy, efficiency and storage. Leaders know that this could be just the beginning.

For centuries, Massachusetts has led the way. We created the first public school, built the nation's first subway, opened the first public beach. Massachusetts has led the nation through the American Revolution and the Industrial Revolution. We could continue to lead through a sustainability revolution - but will we?  

 

The Pledge

As a <City Councilor, Mayor, State Representative, State Senator, Member of Congress, Senator, Governor>, I will make my community and the Commonwealth healthier and more sustainable. Together with my fellow elected and appointed leaders and the community at large, I will vote for legislation, amendments to legislation, or otherwise act to advance the following by:

  • Passing policies that position Massachusetts to accelerate it’s mandated targets as set by the Global Warming Solutions Act, putting us on a path to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 80% by 2050. 
    • Actively advocating for smarter, cleaner, and economical renewable energy developments, such as offshore wind and community-based solar, laying the groundwork for a 100% renewable energy future. 
    • Tackling pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from transportation by supporting improved and expanded clean transportation options, smart land use and development policies, and widespread adoption of electric vehicles. 
  • Preserving and stewarding critical natural areas, wildlife habitat, and water resources. 
  • Involving and protecting low-income and/or environmental justice communities in environmental policy making, acknowledging that these communities often experience the worst consequences of climate change and pollution.